Eclipses explained

Eight mistakes made by first-time eclipse-chasers

A Total Solar Eclipse is brief and, for many, baffling if you’ve not seen one before. Here’s what not to do

First-time eclipse observers often make mistakes that drastically affect their chances of seeing or enjoying the special event. Watching in an organized event is one answer, but you can just as easily plan a trip to watch the eclipse alone if you’re careful NOT to make these eclipse-chaser mistakes:

1 – Underestimate traffic

The key is to be mobile but be aware of the honeypot areas. On April 8, 2024, that will be Texas and there could be a rush the night before. That’s because a lot of people will become aware of the eclipse in the last few days beforehand via social media. However, most people don’t move once in position. Warnings about blocked highways on eclipse day typically don’t come to fruition. Either way, the weather should be obvious a couple of days out so plans can be made slightly ahead of time.


2 – Underestimate Totality

It’s ALL about Totality. What’s wrong with a 99% partial eclipse? Fewer people and it’s surely only 1% less interesting!? Wrong! “The difference between a partial eclipse and a total eclipse is like the difference between reading a menu and dining, or between having super bowl tickets and listening to the game on the radio in the parking lot” says Eddie Mahoney, the only NASA Ambassador, and Director of Astronomy and host of Tour of the Stars at ‘world’s top hotel for stargazing’, the Hyatt Regency Maui.

The difference between a partial eclipse and a total eclipse is like the difference between reading a menu and dining, or between having super bowl tickets and listening to the game on the radio in the parking lot.”


3 – Obsess over the centreline

To see Totality at all you must be within the Path of Totality, and the duration greatly increases from the southern or northern limit (where Totality will be visible for split-second) to a couple of minutes or more as you get to the center of that path. “People should head to the centreline if they can, but once you’re 25 miles within the northern or southern limit you’re getting a decent period of Totality there’s no need to obsess about the centreline, just keep away from the edge – you want to be nicely inside the Path of Totality and then let the thing flow over you,” says David ‘Eclipse Guy’ Makepeace (eclipseguy.com).

There’s no need to obsess about the centreline, just keep away from the edge”


4 – Get the timings wrong

The event itself takes about three hours, beginning with a partial eclipse, peaking about 90 minutes later with Totality for a few minutes. Then the whole spectacle goes into reverse with a decreasing partial eclipse. “One of the things that happens is mistakes about timing. Look on NASA’s website and they’ll give you the universal coordinated time and people need to understand that they have to translate it into the local time zones,” says Mahoney.

There is another source of confusion; since this eclipse stretches from sea to shining sea, it crosses all five continental time zones in the USA. Know your Pacific Daylight Time from your Eastern Daylight Time, and get the nailed-on local timings right for your observation location by using www.timeanddate.com/eclipse


5 – Watch Totality through a camera lens

It lasts a few minutes. Are you seriously going to waste that precious time fiddling with a camera? With thousands upon thousands of professional astrophotographers getting ready for this eclipse, there are bound to be hundreds you can download for free from NASA and the American Astronomical Society. “If you’ve never done astrophotography before, don’t spend Totality fiddling with equipment because you’ll miss the experience,” says Mahoney.

If you’ve never done astrophotography before, don’t spend Totality fiddling with equipment because you’ll miss the experience.”


6 – Not being flexible

Maybe you’ve slavishly checked the predicted weather conditions and decided to avoid certain areas. However, that will count for nothing if you wake up on eclipse day to rain. So have a Plan B – and put it into action before eclipse day. “If I see that the weather is not good on the satellite maps not the night before, but two days before, then I can go somewhere else,” says Tommy Tat-fung Tse from Hong Kong, a veteran of over 10 Total Solar Eclipses.


7 – Not being prepared

You need three hours, a restroom and a chair. That’s it. If you don’t get all of this sorted in advance you’re probably not going to enjoy Totality when it comes. “Just get yourself a nice comfortable lawn chair, sit back, relax and just experience Totality – don’t let anything else distract you,” says Mahoney, who includes photography in that list. “Bring your water and party favors, and your favorite treats and snacks.”

It’s a once in a lifetime event and it’s a life-changing event, and it’s so important to make plans now. If you haven’t, get on it, find out where to be, and how you’re going to get there.”


8 – Overestimate the traffic

Warning: eclipse coming – avoid the entire area. This is a typical response by local people in areas crossed by the Path of Totality, who often panic, fear congestion and annoyance, and flee the area for a few days. So how about avoiding the ‘Totality traffic’ to watch a big 99% partial eclipse from somewhere quiet? “No, no, no – if you can do it, get there, whatever it takes,” says Mahoney. “It’s a once-in-a-lifetime event and it’s a life-changing event, and it’s so important to make plans now. If you haven’t, get on it, find out where to be, and how you’ll get there.”

Image credit: Jamie Carter